I've recently started mturk. I've made just over $200 over the past 5 weeks, with about 2-3 hours a day. The more you do, the more opportunity and "jobs" become available, as some require specific approval ratings. One that I personally enjoy is transcribing audio, which I just became approved to do. Anywhere from $.08 to $.15 for typing 15-30 seconds of audio. Some pay better. 

If I have a blog that is getting 100,000 page views a month that means that I’m probably getting at least 50,000 people to the site (most blogs will do between 1.2 to 1.4 pages per session). That means I have to try and get some small percentage of those people to buy something from me if I really want to do well. If I can’t get them to buy something then (in some cases) I have ads running on the site that will make me money anyways.
People in this type of business normally purchase domain names which have value because they are easy to remember or can help with that site getting traffic. They just register it and start searching for businesses that will find the domain name beneficial for their product. You stand to make a tidy profit if your offer is accepted. Domain names can also be auctioned on sites. The disadvantage here is that it is not a steady source of income but when you do sell a domain name, the profit margin is always great.
Use social media for outreach. Thanks to modern technology and social media, connecting with others has never been easier. You can use these mediums to instantly inform your followers of any updates or changes that you make to your blog. Your fans will also help build your blog by sharing your content with other people they know. Although social media isn't extremely important at the start of your blog, you'll still want to get familiar with some of the basic applications of it as your blog grows.[7]

Friendly heads up: I registered with Kelly Services (or an entity posing as them) and have since been spammed with email and phone calls from various companies, emailing me 10+ daily lists of jobs from totally random places across the US, and calling me morning and evening to ask me about my plans to return to school (?). After more research, I realize it probably wasn’t actually Kelly Services I spoke to, even though the contact form popped up on my screen while I was visiting their verified website. They might be a target for scammers, so be very careful!
Thanks for the kind words, Duby. Changing IP may work here and there, but most companies will catch up. Besides, I personally don’t think it’s right to do that. After all, the companies who spend money to conduct the surveys are trying to get feedback from people in certain places, so if I live somewhere else outside of their targeted area, my feedback isn’t going to help them. In fact it will dilute the feedback from actual targeted residents.

Yelling or swearing at the staff will not get you what you want. From what I've seen, it will only get you longer wait times, more copy and pasted responses, and potentially banned. Be polite, be friendly, try to keep your replies short (without leaving out important details), and say thank you. You're much more likely to get the help you want this way. Remember, the support staff is only there to help you. So, treat them well, and they will likely treat you better.
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